John Calvin. How sweet it is!

So long as we do not look beyond the earth, we are quite pleased with our own righteousness, wisdom, and virtue; we address ourselves in the most flattering terms, and seem only less than demigods. But should we once begin to raise our thoughts to God, and reflect what kind of Being he is, and how absolute the perfection of that righteousness, and wisdom, and virtue, to which, as a standard, we are bound to be conformed, what formerly delighted us by its false show of righteousness will become polluted with the greatest iniquity; what strangely imposed upon us under the name of wisdom will disgust by its extreme folly; and what presented the appearance of virtuous energy will be condemned as the most miserable impotence. 

Calvin, John: Institutes of the Christian Religion Book I, Ch I, Sec 2. (Kindle Locations 783-788). Signalman Publishing. Kindle Edition.

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The goal of theological interpretation

Theological interpretation of the Bible achieves its end when readers enter into the world of the biblical texts with faith, hope, and love. When we make God’s thoughts become our thoughts and God’s word become our word, we begin to participate in the world of the text, in the grand drama of divine redemption. This is perhaps the ultimate aim of theological interpretation of the Bible:to know the triune God by participating in the triune life, in the triune mission to creation.Introduction
What Is Theological Interpretation of the Bible? Introduction by Kevin J. Vanhoozer.

Everyday Theology

Everyday theology is the reflective and practical task of living each

day as faithful disciples of Jesus Christ. Theology is not for Sundays only.

Disciples must walk the Christian way the whole weekend and throughout

the workweek. Theology is an everyday affair: to live to the glory of God

is a full-time privilege and pursuit. Everyday theology is the mandate of

every Christian who is actively trying to walk the way of truth and life.

Theology serves the church by directing the people of God in ways

of speaking and acting that embody the love of God, the reconciliation

won by Jesus Christ, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit. Theology not

only articulates beliefs but suggests “designs for living.” Precisely what

form our life together takes, however, depends on where (and when) we

are: the house churches in first-century Palestine are a far cry from medieval

monasteries or modern megachurches. The gospel gets worked out

somewhat differently in diverse cultural settings. The gospel—the power

of God unto salvation—can transform culture; culture, however, is only

too happy to return the compliment. Everyday Christians have to learn

to negotiate their way carefully, following the one way of Jesus Christ

through a variety of cultural byways.

Everyday Theology: How to Read Cultural Texts and Interpret Trends, pg 7,

Edited by Kevin J. Vanhoozer, Charles A. Anderson, Michael J. Sleasman, Baker Academic,

a division of Baker Publishing Group. © 2007.