A method for Christians to counter the effects of modernism and postmodernism

That first version of the book focused mainly on the challenges of “modernism,” that scientific, rationalistic materialism that leaves no room for any kind of supernatural worldview. Though this way of thinking remains, the paradigms have now shifted, and we are in a “postmodern” climate, in which truth is seen to be not objective at all, not a discovery but a construction. Truth, it is claimed, is relative, culturally-conditioned, a function of the will, and ultimately unknowable.

Christians should use and develop their minds. The mental faculties of the human mind—the power to think, to discover, to wonder, and to imagine—are precious gifts of God. The Christian who pursues knowledge, seeks education, and explores even the most “secular” subjects is fulfilling a Christian vocation that is pleasing to God and of great importance to the Church. The Bible, by precept and example, affirms this and opens up the whole realm of human knowledge to the Christian.

Veith, Gene Edward (2003-10-07). Loving God with All Your Mind: Thinking as a Christian in a Postmodern World (pp. 7-8,11). Good News Publishers. Kindle Edition.

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John Calvin. How sweet it is!

So long as we do not look beyond the earth, we are quite pleased with our own righteousness, wisdom, and virtue; we address ourselves in the most flattering terms, and seem only less than demigods. But should we once begin to raise our thoughts to God, and reflect what kind of Being he is, and how absolute the perfection of that righteousness, and wisdom, and virtue, to which, as a standard, we are bound to be conformed, what formerly delighted us by its false show of righteousness will become polluted with the greatest iniquity; what strangely imposed upon us under the name of wisdom will disgust by its extreme folly; and what presented the appearance of virtuous energy will be condemned as the most miserable impotence. 

Calvin, John: Institutes of the Christian Religion Book I, Ch I, Sec 2. (Kindle Locations 783-788). Signalman Publishing. Kindle Edition.

Oklahoma tornado: Tragedy for the Christian?

The bottom-line assumption for anyone who believes in the God of providence is that ultimately there are no tragedies. God has promised that all things that happen-all pain, all suffering, all tragedies-are but for a moment, and that He works in and through these events for the good of those who love Him (Rom. 8:28). That’s why the apostle Paul said that the pain, the suffering, the affliction that we bear in this world isn’t worthy to be compared, isn’t worthy to be mentioned in the same breath, with the glory and the blessedness that God has stored up for His people (Rom. 8:18).

R. C. Sproul. Surprised by Suffering: The Role of Pain and Death in The Christian Life (Kindle Locations 509-512). Kindle Edition.